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Wicked Local Stoughton: Church sign dedicated in memory of maintenance man

Trinity Episcopal Church in Stoughton recently erected a new sign in memory of Lawrence Corbett, a retired town carpenter who kept the church well maintained for many years.
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In the News

Falmouth Enterprise: Enjoy a hot meal on a cold day with Around the Table

A standing lunch date holds for any resident who needs it Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the parish hall at St. Barnabas's Episcopal Church in Falmouth.  Around the Table provides regular, free hot meals to the community. The all-volunteer-run effort is going into its 33rd year.  “We’re here for anybody who needs a meal,” said Lesley L. Sullivan, who serves as treasurer for Around the Table. “Even if we are here for one person, it’s worth it because that’s one person who wouldn’t have a meal."
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Boston Herald: In immigration storm, a refuge at Dorchester church

If all priests were blessed with the Rev. Edwin D. Johnson’s smile, churches wouldn’t need lights.Incandescent is the only word to describe what happens when the 34-year-old pastor of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Dorchester speaks about putting his faith and his church on the front lines of a Trumpian universe.Earlier this week, St. Mary’s proudly declared itself to be a sanctuary church. That means the 170-year-old house of worship overlooking Uphams Corner will offer refuge to any undocumented or refugee family seeking shelter.
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Newburyport Daily News: Local religious leaders address immigration ban

Proudly displaying an “Immigrants and Refugees Welcome” banner in front of her Newburyport church, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church rector the Rev. Martha Hubbard admitted she has sensed a lot of uncertainty and even fear within the community regarding the Trump administration and its policies.“As people of faith, we are always trying to cast out fear and focus on how we can join hands and do things together and not let fear create division,” she said. “Those of us who work for economic and political justice around the world feel a little overwhelmed.” 
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Boston Herald: Faith leaders unite against crackdown

Boston-area Christian, Jewish, and Muslim leaders say they are joining forces to combat President Trump’s crackdown on sanctuary cities.  “We will stand with our Muslim neighbors. We will stand with our undocumented neighbors,” said the Rev. Dorothella Little-page, who serves Episcopal congregations in Roxbury and Dorchester. The Rev. Edwin Johnson of St. Mary’s Church in Dorchester said he’s prepared to open his doors to offer safe housing to anyone affected by the president’s executive orders on immigration. He calls his church a “sanctuary congregation.”“That’s what we’re called to by our faith, and we’re working to be prepared physically and otherwise,” he said, speaking with Littlepage and others yesterday at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul.
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Boston Globe: Clergy want Baker to forcefully oppose Trump refugee edict

In a morning gathering at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, scores of interfaith clergy and religious activists on Tuesday called on Governor Charlie Baker to strongly oppose President Trump’s executive orders on immigration and refugees and pressed the state’s top elected official to make Massachusetts a “sanctuary state.” “We are standing up and proclaiming that we will stand with our Muslim neighbors, and we will stand with undocumented immigrants,” the Rev. Dorothella Littlepage, an Episcopal priest who serves a collaboration of churches in Roxbury and Dorchester, said.The clergy urged Baker to support the Massachusetts Safe Communities Act, a pending proposal that would prohibit state and local police from participating in immigration enforcement, provide due process rights for those detained for civil immigration violations, and prohibit any “Muslim registry” or similar federal effort from accessing state databases.
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Taunton Gazette: National Day of Remembrance brings together those who have been hurt by opioid epidemic

People of different ethnicities, incomes, ages and beliefs poured into the Trinity Episcopal Church in Bridgewater Sunday night, Jan. 29. Although these people come from many different backgrounds they were all gathered for the same somber reason: Each person there had been affected in some way by the ongoing opioid epidemic.  "Addiction does not discriminate," said Tara Lane, whose older brother Jeffrey Lane, of Brockton, lost his battle with addiction in 2016. "The people that struggle with addiction are people just like you and I." Jan. 29 was the National Day of Remembrance, which honors, helps and brings together community members and families that have lost loved ones to drug addiction.  "We want this to be a lasting image of hope," said the Rev. Natasha Stewart. "There is still light even in darkness."
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South Coast Today: Dartmouth gathering honors loved ones lost to addiction

St. Peter's Episcopal Church held a service on Jan. 29 to remember and honor lives of loved ones lost to alcoholism and drug overdoses.  "It's so great to see so many of you here today and coming together as a community," said Rev. Scott Ciosek as he began his sermon.  In October, the church at 351 Elm Street held a service for anyone struggling with addiction which brought about 40 people together, Ciosek said, but Sunday's service was held on the Addiction Policy Forum's National Day of Remembrance and focused on healing and the grieving process.
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Milton Access TV: "Milton Reflecting" on racism and diversity

The Rev. Hall Kirkham of St. Michael's Church in Milton joins "Milton Reflecting" show host Ron Bell to talk about work with the Milton Interfaith Clergy Association and Milton Reflecting Group on issues of racism and diversity.  Kirkham and some members of St. Michael’s have been involved this year in conversations on race within the Town of Milton through multifaith and multicultural groups that they hope can prove to be transformative.
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Lowell Sun: A little church with a big heart in Shirley

Trinity Chapel, a small, friendly Episcopal congregation in the historic village of Shirley Center, was founded in 1902, and many years later the congregation is still going strong with its worship and community service.  Four years ago, two couples from the congregation got together for dinner and began talking about the church and how they could become more visible in the community.  "They came up with the idea of hosting community forums which would cover topics of interest and they would find speakers to come and talk about those topics," the Rev. Marsha Hoecker said. "I believe the first forum was on bullying in the schools, with other towns like Leominster and Ayer joining us."  The community forums are held once a month, excluding December and the summer months.
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