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Lowell Sun: Clergy rally in Lowell for immigrants

The clergy members stood shoulder to shoulder April 25 at St. Anne's Episcopal Church in Lowell with a promise to help undocumented immigrants.  The nearly 20 faith leaders were there to formally announce the formation of the Merrimack Valley Sanctuary Network, through which they plan to offer shelter, needed supplies or services to undocumented immigrants who are threatened with deportation.
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In the News

Danvers Patch: All Saints Episcopal Church of the North Shore to install first rector

On Tuesday, May 2, at 7 p.m., All Saints' Episcopal Church of the North Shore will celebrate the installation of its first rector, the Rev. Marya DeCarlen, who will serve full time. The bishop of the Diocese of Massachusetts, the Right Rev. Alan Gates, will preside, and there will be a ceremony with trumpet and cantor and even a contingent of All Saints'-certified therapy dogs. All are most welcome to attend.
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In the News

'Unholy Trinity' serves as call to action on poverty, racism, gun violence

Eager to work toward solutions to the problems of poverty, racism and gun violence, Episcopal bishops, clergy members and lay people gathered for three days last week for a conference in Chicago, the American city that recorded the most homicides in 2016.The city’s recent surge in deadly violence provided a grim backdrop for Bishops United Against Gun Violence’s “Unholy Trinity” conference held April 20-22 at the Lutheran School of Theology in the city’s Hyde Park neighborhood. But speakers regularly emphasized that the problem is not isolated to one city, nor is the outlook as bleak as many news headlines suggest.Workshops offered April 21 in the afternoon featured discussions of how to lobby legislators, how to engage with evangelical Christians on these issues and how to develop community organizing campaigns. In one session, the Rev. Carol Reese discussed her work as a chaplain in the trauma center of Chicago’s John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital, while in another session a delegation from the Diocese of Massachusetts explained the diocese’s successes working with youth in a program called B-Peace for Jorge, named after a young man who was murdered in 2012.
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In the News

South Coast Today: As opioid epidemic grows, South Coast suburbs amp up response

While New Bedford has long dealt with opioid addiction, the epidemic extends beyond city bounds. Residents of South Coast suburbs, realizing that opioid addiction is a regionwide problem, have begun to form collaborations and hold events.  The Rev. Scott Ciosek of St. Peter's Church in Dartmouth said he thinks a lot of people may feel like God has shut them out and due to their life story or self image feel like they wouldn't be welcome in a church.  As the executive director of The Bridge: A Center for Hope and Healing, he facilitates grief groups for those who have lost loved ones to addiction or overdose.  "There's such a need for it," he said. It took about a year and a half of planning to clean out and rehabilitate the building next to the church to help restore what Ciosek saw as a shortage of mental health services and grief groups on the SouthCoast. The nonprofit is a little over a year old.
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In the News

Metrowest Daily News: Dover church holds 'ashes to go' service

St. Dunstan's Episcopal Church in Dover held an "ashes to go" service early Wednesday morning for people on their way to work or school. See photos from the Metrowest Daily News.
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In the News

South Coast Today: On Ash Wednesday, the church goes to the people

St. Martin's Episcopal Church came to the people on Ash Wednesday instead of the people going to the church.  The Rev. Scott A. Ciosek, priest-in-charge of St. Martin's Episcopal Church as well as St. Peter's Episcopal Church, South Dartmouth, was giving ashes to people in the parking lot of the house of worship at County and Rivet streets in the city's South End.  People either parked their vehicles in the lot and walked over to Ciosek or drove their vehicles up to him, rolled down their windows and received the church's blessings as they sat in their vehicles, their car motors still running. "This is a beautiful way for us to get out to where the people are," said Ciosek. "It's a great way to meet people. That's our intention — to meet people and let them know they are loved by God."
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Wicked Local Stoughton: Church sign dedicated in memory of maintenance man

Trinity Episcopal Church in Stoughton recently erected a new sign in memory of Lawrence Corbett, a retired town carpenter who kept the church well maintained for many years.
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In the News

Falmouth Enterprise: Enjoy a hot meal on a cold day with Around the Table

A standing lunch date holds for any resident who needs it Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the parish hall at St. Barnabas's Episcopal Church in Falmouth.  Around the Table provides regular, free hot meals to the community. The all-volunteer-run effort is going into its 33rd year.  “We’re here for anybody who needs a meal,” said Lesley L. Sullivan, who serves as treasurer for Around the Table. “Even if we are here for one person, it’s worth it because that’s one person who wouldn’t have a meal."
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In the News

Boston Herald: In immigration storm, a refuge at Dorchester church

If all priests were blessed with the Rev. Edwin D. Johnson’s smile, churches wouldn’t need lights.Incandescent is the only word to describe what happens when the 34-year-old pastor of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Dorchester speaks about putting his faith and his church on the front lines of a Trumpian universe.Earlier this week, St. Mary’s proudly declared itself to be a sanctuary church. That means the 170-year-old house of worship overlooking Uphams Corner will offer refuge to any undocumented or refugee family seeking shelter.
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Newburyport Daily News: Local religious leaders address immigration ban

Proudly displaying an “Immigrants and Refugees Welcome” banner in front of her Newburyport church, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church rector the Rev. Martha Hubbard admitted she has sensed a lot of uncertainty and even fear within the community regarding the Trump administration and its policies.“As people of faith, we are always trying to cast out fear and focus on how we can join hands and do things together and not let fear create division,” she said. “Those of us who work for economic and political justice around the world feel a little overwhelmed.” 
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