The Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts Logo

Text Resize

-A +A
Diocese Seal

Diocese and Parish News

Reflections

"Unholy Trinity" peacemakers "challenged to be more courageous"

“…seek peace, and pursue it.” (Psalm 34:14)In pursuit of peace, 14 people from the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts traveled to Chicago April 20-22 for a conference entitled "The Unholy Trinity:  Poverty, Racism and Gun Violence."  The three-day event was the second conference convened by Bishops United Against Gun Violence, a group of more than 60 Episcopal Church bishops from across the country who are dedicated to using their power as people of prayer to combat the scourge of gun violence that plagues all of our communities. 
Reflections
Reflections

A tale of two houses: An Easter message from Bishop Gates

"There are voices in our world, and perhaps even sometimes within our own frightened hearts, which will tell us that our Easter rejoicing is foolishness; that life really is meaningless; that celebrating the passion and resurrection of Jesus Christ is folly; that the fellowship and strength received by those who claim a place in the Body of the Risen Christ is nothing but a crutch and an illusion. ...Don’t believe it."  The full text of Bishop Gates's Easter message follows.
Reflections
Reflections

Reflection: Out of “the bewilderness” and into resurrection

The Gospel reading for the first Sunday of Lent is the same every year.  Lent begins with Jesus being led (or driven, depending on which Gospel we’re reading) by the Spirit into the wilderness, and with the story of what happens to Jesus there.  This year, I was discussing the readings for the beginning of Lent with a friend and colleague with whom I sometimes collaborate as we prepare our respective sermons.  He said to me, “I love that term you coined.”  I must have looked a little confused because he explained that as I was talking about the Gospel reading, I kept ref
Reflections
Reflections

Why we need these ashes: An excerpt from Bishop Gayle Harris's Ash Wednesday sermon

...We need Ash Wednesday, the mark of ashes, to remember we are mortal, temporary travellers on the planet, and that we are given stewardship to care for God's creation and each other.We need these ashes.  Our civic discourse is full of appeals to the lowest and most base in us, victimizing victims so that those who think they should be entitled can again feel that they are above others, "true" Americans.  We need Ash Wednesday, the mark of ashes, to remind us that we are to be humble, just as God in Jesus humbled himself to lift us, and so we are to lift others.
Reflections
Reflections

Advent agents of reflected light: A message from Bishop Gates

Advent is often understood as a time of waiting expectantly.  Our scriptures focus on Mary in her faithful pondering and Zechariah in his mute vigil.  Yet Advent is a time not only of waiting, but also of preparing.  Indeed, visions which describe the world which God intends – lion and lamb in reconciled harmony, sword beaten into plowshare – these are visions not only of that for which we wait, but that for which we must work.  Alongside texts recalling the quiet expectation of Zechariah and Mary, we read texts recalling the urgent cry of Isaiah and John the Baptist:  Prepare!
Reflections
Reflections

A message from Bishop Alan M. Gates: Giving thanks for women in holy orders

Forty years ago today the General Convention of The Episcopal Church voted to authorize the ordination of women.  For many of us it is difficult to remember or imagine our church without this expression of wholeness. 
Reflections
Reflections

Lessons from the early church: Presidential election not the biggest story in the universe

Last week, I had the privilege to gather with the other 200-plus Episcopal priests in the Diocese of Massachusetts who attended our annual conference.  We heard from Andrew McGowan, the dean of my former seminary, Berkeley at Yale Divinity School.  He spoke about his research into the early church and how it shapes our prayer book and worship.  Among other things, the early church developed its common life and practice in the face of persecution from the state.  Simply to be a Christian was to be a radical, to resist the power of the dominant narrative of commerce and op
Reflections
Reflections

"Don't be ashamed to be people of love": Presiding Bishop Curry's 2016 Easter message

Find the text of Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry's 2016 Easter message here.
Reflections
Reflections

"Empty tombs": An Easter message from Bishop Gates

My father was always a notorious pack rat.  Some of his collecting fell under the heading of sentimentality – knick-knacks and mementos from his travels or his childhood.  Other items were in the category of thrift – broken things that might one day be fixed, scraps of things that might one day be useful.  So our family basement was always lined with tall metal storage shelves filled with boxes of stuff.  One day some years ago I happened to discover that several boxes on the shelves were actually empty.  I asked my mother why we were storing so many large empty box
Reflections
Reflections

Reflection: Show us what there yet can be

It's a brand new year once more--full of hope and promise, full of anticipation of what it may bring, in our own lives, in the lives of those around us and in the life of the world.  New Year's Day means many things to many people--resolutions, parades, fireworks, champagne, football, to name a few.  In the Episcopal Church, we celebrate New Year's Day as the Feast of the Holy Name.  We celebrate the day Jesus was officially given his hame, which means "the one who saves."
Reflections