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Diocesan News

Video: Come and see!

The Episcopal Church in eastern Massachusetts invites you to come and see what makes our faith communities meaningful to the people who call them home. 
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Diocese and Parish News

Diocesan News

Patriots fans rally behind Episcopal Relief & Development

Episcopalians across New England rallied to help raise $27,577 in a charitable contest launched last week by the bishops of the New England and Atlanta dioceses to see whose fans could raise the most money for Episcopal Relief & Development by game time on Super Bowl Sunday.
Diocesan News
Diocesan News

Keeping a holy Lent: Devotional resources

Ash Wednesday, on March 1, 2017, invites us to the observance of a holy Lent--the season of penitence, reconciliation and renewal that leads to Easter.  For those taking on a devotional practice during Lent, here are some homegrown and locally recommended resources.
Diocesan News
In the News

Boston Herald: In immigration storm, a refuge at Dorchester church

If all priests were blessed with the Rev. Edwin D. Johnson’s smile, churches wouldn’t need lights.Incandescent is the only word to describe what happens when the 34-year-old pastor of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Dorchester speaks about putting his faith and his church on the front lines of a Trumpian universe.Earlier this week, St. Mary’s proudly declared itself to be a sanctuary church. That means the 170-year-old house of worship overlooking Uphams Corner will offer refuge to any undocumented or refugee family seeking shelter.
In the News
In the News

Newburyport Daily News: Local religious leaders address immigration ban

Proudly displaying an “Immigrants and Refugees Welcome” banner in front of her Newburyport church, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church rector the Rev. Martha Hubbard admitted she has sensed a lot of uncertainty and even fear within the community regarding the Trump administration and its policies.“As people of faith, we are always trying to cast out fear and focus on how we can join hands and do things together and not let fear create division,” she said. “Those of us who work for economic and political justice around the world feel a little overwhelmed.” 
In the News
In the News

Boston Herald: Faith leaders unite against crackdown

Boston-area Christian, Jewish, and Muslim leaders say they are joining forces to combat President Trump’s crackdown on sanctuary cities.  “We will stand with our Muslim neighbors. We will stand with our undocumented neighbors,” said the Rev. Dorothella Little-page, who serves Episcopal congregations in Roxbury and Dorchester. The Rev. Edwin Johnson of St. Mary’s Church in Dorchester said he’s prepared to open his doors to offer safe housing to anyone affected by the president’s executive orders on immigration. He calls his church a “sanctuary congregation.”“That’s what we’re called to by our faith, and we’re working to be prepared physically and otherwise,” he said, speaking with Littlepage and others yesterday at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul.
In the News
In the News

Boston Globe: Clergy want Baker to forcefully oppose Trump refugee edict

In a morning gathering at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, scores of interfaith clergy and religious activists on Tuesday called on Governor Charlie Baker to strongly oppose President Trump’s executive orders on immigration and refugees and pressed the state’s top elected official to make Massachusetts a “sanctuary state.” “We are standing up and proclaiming that we will stand with our Muslim neighbors, and we will stand with undocumented immigrants,” the Rev. Dorothella Littlepage, an Episcopal priest who serves a collaboration of churches in Roxbury and Dorchester, said.The clergy urged Baker to support the Massachusetts Safe Communities Act, a pending proposal that would prohibit state and local police from participating in immigration enforcement, provide due process rights for those detained for civil immigration violations, and prohibit any “Muslim registry” or similar federal effort from accessing state databases.
In the News
In the News

Taunton Gazette: National Day of Remembrance brings together those who have been hurt by opioid epidemic

People of different ethnicities, incomes, ages and beliefs poured into the Trinity Episcopal Church in Bridgewater Sunday night, Jan. 29. Although these people come from many different backgrounds they were all gathered for the same somber reason: Each person there had been affected in some way by the ongoing opioid epidemic.  "Addiction does not discriminate," said Tara Lane, whose older brother Jeffrey Lane, of Brockton, lost his battle with addiction in 2016. "The people that struggle with addiction are people just like you and I." Jan. 29 was the National Day of Remembrance, which honors, helps and brings together community members and families that have lost loved ones to drug addiction.  "We want this to be a lasting image of hope," said the Rev. Natasha Stewart. "There is still light even in darkness."
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Diocesan News

"Increased Compassion, Not Hardened Hearts": Bishops join MA church leaders opposing refugee restriction

Bishop Alan M. Gates and Bishop Gayle E. Harris of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, together with Bishop Douglas J. Fisher of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts, have signed a joint letter from 17 church leaders, issued today by the Massachusetts Council of Churches, opposing the White House executive action suspending refugee resettlement.
Diocesan News
Diocesan News

Join Bishop Gayle Harris on Holy Land pilgrimage

Bishop Gayle E. Harris and the Rev. Debbie Phillips of Grace Church in Salem will lead a diocesan mission pilgrimage in Israel and Palestine, Nov. 24-Dec. 6, and they invite others to join them. 
Diocesan News
In the News

South Coast Today: Dartmouth gathering honors loved ones lost to addiction

St. Peter's Episcopal Church held a service on Jan. 29 to remember and honor lives of loved ones lost to alcoholism and drug overdoses.  "It's so great to see so many of you here today and coming together as a community," said Rev. Scott Ciosek as he began his sermon.  In October, the church at 351 Elm Street held a service for anyone struggling with addiction which brought about 40 people together, Ciosek said, but Sunday's service was held on the Addiction Policy Forum's National Day of Remembrance and focused on healing and the grieving process.
In the News